New Drug Approved to Treat ADHD

The new drug Vyvanse received approval on Monday by the Food and Drug Administration to affectively treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Although the medication received approval, it will come with a black box warning due to the possible side affects of the amphetamine contained in the medication.

The drug is manufactured by Shire PLC, the manufacturer of the current blockbuster ADHD medication Aderall XR. According to HealthDay, “The wire service quotes Shire spokesman Matt Cabrey as saying that the company has tested Vyvanse on adults who have a history of stimulant abuse to assess its “likeability.” The outcome, according to Shire, was that Vyvanse delays the intensity of amphetamine effects, which include increased alertness, physical activity, and decreased appetite.”

The ADHD drug is being produced by Shire PLC in hopes to replace Aderall XR who patent expires in 2009. According to IMS Health, Total sales for Aderall have increased by more than 300 percent in the last four years, earning more than $3.6 billion last year.

According to a recent poll from the US Department of Education, one in every ten students of 22 million students polled said they used or have used Aderall or a similar medication, many without a prescription. Many college students report using Aderall to pull all nighters, or cram for an upcoming test.

ADHD medication increased concentration, alertness, focus, short term memory, and wakefulness. Some side affects include suppressed appetite, amphetamine dependency, and heart attack.

Visit this Consumer Advocacy website for more information on ordering from an online Mexican pharmacy.

All About the New Drug to Quit Smoking

Smoking tobacco is a deadly habit which claims millions of lives every year. The majority of the world’s population, however, are still grappling with this addiction. Tobacco contains a powerful, addictive drug – nicotine and smokers find it hard if not impossible to give up this habit.

If you are a cigarette smoker and you are serious to quit smoking for a better tomorrow, then you can try taking Cytisine which has been tested to be very effective. It’s vital to stop smoking as it can cause severe health complications such as mouth cancer, lung cancer, throat cancer, stroke, infertility and high blood pressure.

What may be more dangerous is the effect of smoking on those who are exposed to it. That exposure can be hazardous, especially to those closest to you. In fact, most of the smoke from a cigarette escapes into the air where it can be inhaled by any non-smoker unlucky enough to be seated or standing next to you. Thus, giving up smoking will prove to be a prudent decision for yourself and others around you. You also save a lot of money on buying tons of cigarettes every day. Considering all the health dangers associated with smoking, you must try to quit smoking right away.

Cytisine is a medicine that has been used to treat nicotine addiction in Europe for many years. The drug is an alkaloid contained in Cytisus Laburnum (Golden rain acacia), especially in its seeds. Cytisine is said to perform the same role as nicotine. It has the ability to stimulate the brain’s receptors that are also stimulated by nicotine, and has been used as a substitute for tobacco for almost half a century.

Cytisine is marketed by Tabex – a Bulgarian pharmaceutical company. Currently, the recommended prescription of the drug is one tablet for every two hours. One should take a total of six tablets per day. The standard duration for this treatment is 25 days. The drug cytisine has been proven to be more effective than a placebo. Researchers claim that its low cost has made it a preferred alternative to other stop-smoking drugs. This means it could be an advantage to developing countries since it is reasonably priced.

Side effects of taking Cytisine

Several studies have shown that cytisine, sold as Tabex, has some side effects, as well. These effects include dry mouth, stomach ache, nausea, heartburn and difficulty in breathing. These conditions, however, are generally trivial and temporary.

Conclusion

If there is a stop-smoking medication that is affordable, effective and safe, then it would be Tabex. This medication is safe for everyone except those under the age of 18 years. However, you should take the drug only as recommended by a physician. You can purchase Cytisine Tabex online through any of the registered medical stores after consulting a physician and getting it prescribed. The doctor will confirm the safety of the drug for your body as excessive dosage can hamper breathing and cause death. Nevertheless, correct use of this anti-smoking medication may increase your chances of quitting cigarettes significantly.

10 Tips for Buying Cheap Drugs Online

Everyone wants to save money, and the good news is that purchasing medicine online is both easy and affordable. This is because online pharmacies have a much lower overhead expenses.. The US Pharmacopeia (USP) has joined forces with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) together with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) has established quality control standards for all medications dispensed by pharmacies throughout United States. Their intention is to prevent consumers from receiving poor quality and/or harmful medicines from online pharmacies.

US Pharmacopeia (USP), Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Association of Boards of Pharmacy offer these ten tips to consumers who are thinking of buying health products online:

1. Do not purchase from an illegal website. This means putting yourself at risk. The danger of you being able to purchase contaminated or counterfeit product is there, aside from the fact that you may also be given the wrong product, an incorrect dose or worse yet, you could not receive any product at all since most illegal web sites do not maintain longevity.

2. Purchasing an unsafe or inappropriate medication may put you at risk or cause serious health consequences.

3. Obtain prescriptions from your doctor before purchasing drugs online. Moreover, it is not a good idea to purchase a prescription drug online without seeing first your doctor even if you fill out a health-probing questionnaire. The questionnaire does not provide sufficient information that would enable a doctor to determine if that drug is safe for you to use, if another treatment is more appropriate, or if you have an underlying medical condition which could be negatively affected by the drug you are about to purchase.

4. Always try to consult a doctor before using any medication for the first time. This way you can thwart any negative side-effects that the medicine might cause you.

5. Avoid sites that offer to prescribe a prescription drug for the first time without a physical exam, sell a prescription drug without a prescription, or sell drugs that are not approved by Food and Drug Administration. Taking drugs without any physical check up can be harmful to your health and may even cause death.

6. Do not buy from a web site that does not have any access to a registered pharmacist that can answer questions.

7. Avoid sites that don’t contain information about the owner of the site and do not provide a street address and phone number to contact should problems arise.

8. If possible, refrain from purchasing from foreign web sites because generally it is illegal to import drugs from these sites and the risks you are facing are much greater. You could actually be held personally liable for importing this drug.

9. Be very careful in dealing with sites that claim that they have found a new cure for a certain serious disorder and offer quick cure-alls for a wide range of ailments. Likewise, stay away from sites that include undocumented case histories claiming remarkable results.

10. Beware of sites that make use of impressive sounding medical terminology to disguise their lack of research or those that claim that the government, the medical profession, or research scientists have conspired to suppress a products in spite of the effectiveness of the product to cure serious diseases. And if you want to be sure that you are purchasing from a licensed online pharmacy you may check out the site with the VIPPS and see whether it is a licensed pharmacy with good standing.

Rise in Popularity of Online Pharmacies Has Serious Consequences

The unregulated sale of controlled drugs through online pharmacies is a growing trend in the United States. In a society heavily influenced by the sultry lure of the prescription medications that are currently used to treat a variety of biological and behavioral problems, it comes as no surprise that eventually many of our medical needs would be met by online pharmaceutical retailers. There are many benefits to this type of drug distribution. The disabled or homebound population can have their medications conveniently delivered to their homes, shoppers enjoy a certain level of discretion and anonymity, and the selection of products is vast. Item information can be easily researched and compared through the use of websites, and computers can quickly catch potentially dangerous prescription errors. However, despite the seeming benefits of this online trade, there are many significant drawbacks also associated with the sale of online prescription drugs.

In a study released last Wednesday July 9th, by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, under the leadership of Joseph Califano, it was found that most websites selling prescription opioids, stimulants, and depressants require no legitimate prescription to do so. This rise in illegitimate drug activity has also been linked to the growing abuse of prescription drugs especially amongst college students. This year alone there are 365 sites devoted to selling controlled medications by mail. Controlled drugs commonly purchased without a prescription included Oxycontin, methadone, Vicodin, Xanax, and Valium.

According to a 2005 study completed by Christopher Littlejohn and his associates, online merchants can be categorized into four basic types–“legitimate,” “subscription,” “lifestyle” and “no-prescription.” Legitimate pharmacies operate similarly to traditional pharmacies. Customers must have a prescription from a licensed medical practitioner, and in general these websites do not offer the types of controlled prescription drugs that are most commonly obtained illegally and abused. Users of subscription pharmacies are granted access to a full range of drugs without a prescription once they sign up for a program and pay a membership fee. These subscription websites are furtively maintained in hard-to-regulate areas of the world like Mexico and Asia. Lifestyle pharmacies ask customers to fill out a medical questionnaire in lieu of a prescription. They commonly provide more elective or luxury drugs that treat conditions such as alopecia, obesity, and impotence. No-Prescription pharmacies are just that. These are sites that are willing to mail controlled drugs to online customers without a prescription. Littlejohn’s study also contended that the people who most commonly ordered drugs illegally from these websites were literate, credit card owning individuals with internet access. These three factors also lead to the inference that the abusers of online pharmacies are of a relatively high socioeconomic status.

There are many distressing consequences associated with the sale of prescription drugs online. Unlike conventional pharmacies, there is little to no consumer protection over the internet. Products can be advertised with false claims and the sale of unapproved trial drugs goes unchecked. The administrators of illegal websites often remain anonymous and can quickly disable and create new sites that make it difficult for any regulatory agency to keep track of their activities. Operations are also commonly run outside of the U.S. making law enforcement officials scramble to put together international cooperation efforts.

This lack of effective online pharmacy regulation can lead to disastrous consequences. Francine Haight of La Mesa, Calif lost her son Ryan to an overdose of the generic form of Vicodin, which he ordered without her permission online with a debit card. “The Internet made it easy for the drug dealers to sneak into your living room,” she said. The sale of online drugs has lead to drug and substance abuse, and death related to drug interactions, incorrect dosage or administration, and impure drugs. Illegal prescriptions can end up in the hands of children or others who are incapable of using them responsibly.

As the sale of controlled drugs without a prescription is a recent phenomenon, means of combating the trend are still in development. The FDA has vowed to increase public outreach and awareness, expand enforcement, and develop tighter bonds of international cooperation. In April the “Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act” was approved by the Senate and is currently being reviewed in House committee meetings. If passed, the legislation would require online pharmacies to be properly certified and for doctors to meet in person with patients before giving out a prescription for a controlled drug. Some state governments have already passed laws that regulate the online drug trade but many advocates are pushing for stricter federal regulation. Some search engine companies have begun to fight back against online sellers by employing a program called, “Pharmacy Checker.” The device filters out unlawful advertisers and forces them to provide verification.

The sale of controlled drugs over the internet is proliferating quickly and as is commonly seen with progress in technology, there is a gap between action and regulation. According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, 85% of internet drugs sales are controlled drugs while only 11% of those same drugs are being sold at traditional pharmacies. These statistics display the obvious potential for drug abuse and need for greater online pharmaceutical quality control. In a society where prescription drugs have become the norm rather than psychotherapy, counseling, or cognitive behavioral therapy, this online market flourishes.

Sources:

Eckholm, Eirk. (2008, July 9). Abuses Found in Online Sales of Medication. New York Times, Retrieved July 10th, 2008, from nytimes.com/2008/07/09/health/09drugs.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Henney, Jane. (2001). Cyberpharmacies and the role of the US Food and Drug Administration. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 3(1), Retrieved July 10, 2008 from the PubMed database.

Littlejohn,C., Baldacchino, A., Schifano, F., & Deluca, P. (2005). Internet Pharmacies And Online Prescription Drug Sales: a cross-sectional study. Drugs: education prevention and policy, 12, 75-80. Retrieved July 10th 2008, from the Academic Search Premier database.